Dr. Reshad Kurrimbukus

OVERVIEW

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a long-term disorder in which the kidneys do not function properly.

It’s a common ailment that’s commonly linked to growing older. It can affect anyone, however it is more common in African-Americans and persons of South Asian descent.

CKD can worsen with time, and the kidneys may eventually stop working altogether, but this is rare. Many persons with CKD can live long lives despite their illness.

Symptoms

In the early stages of kidney disease, there are usually no symptoms. It can only be detected if you have a blood or urine test for another reason and the findings reveal a suspected kidney disease.

At a more advanced stage, symptoms can include:

  • tiredness
  • swollen ankles, feet or hands
  • shortness of breath
  • feeling sick
  • blood in your pee (urine)

Causes of CKD

  • Other illnesses that put a load on the kidneys are frequently the cause of chronic renal disease. It’s frequently the outcome of a combination of issues.
  • CKD can be caused by a variety of factors, including:
  • high blood pressure – over time, this can put a burden on the kidneys’ small blood veins, preventing them from performing properly.
  • Diabetes — too much glucose in the blood can harm the kidneys’ small filters.
  • High cholesterol can cause fatty deposits to form in the blood vessels supplying your kidneys, making it difficult for them to function correctly.
  • infections of the kidneys
  • glomerulonephritis – inflammation of the kidneys
  • Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a hereditary illness in which cysts form in the kidneys.
  • long-term, regular use of certain medicines – such as lithium and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
  • blockages in the flow of urine – for example, from recurring kidney stones or an enlarged prostate long-term, regular use of certain medicines – such as lithium and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)

Tests for CKD

Blood and urine testing can be used to diagnose CKD. These tests check for abnormally high levels of particular compounds in your blood and urine, which indicate that your kidneys aren’t functioning properly.

If you have a high chance of developing kidney disease (for example, if you have a known risk factor like high blood pressure or diabetes), you may be advised to have regular testing to detect CKD early on.

Your blood and urine test results can be used to determine the stage of your kidney disease. This is a number that indicates the severity of kidney disease, with a larger value signifying more severe CKD.

Treatments for CKD

Although there is no cure for CKD, medication can help to alleviate symptoms and prevent it from worsening.

Your treatment will be determined by the severity of your disease.

The following are the main treatments:

Changes in your lifestyle to help you stay as healthy as possible

dialysis – treatment to replicate some of the kidney’s functions; this may be necessary in advanced CKD kidney transplant – this may also be necessary in advanced CKD medicine to control associated problems such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol dialysis – treatment to replicate some of the kidney’s functions; this may be necessary in advanced CKD

Regular check-ups to monitor your condition will also be recommended.

My locations

I can offer consultations in several locations across Mauritius. Some of them are:

EDUCATION

DES Medecine Interne
Universite de Poitiers

DFMSA Gastro
Universite Bordeaux

Diplome DCEM
Universite Bordeaux

Diplome Docteur
Universite de Poitiers